Venue & Hospitality

Conference Center: Crown Plaza Dublin Airport, Park Northwood, Northwood Ave, Dublin 9, Ireland
Accommodations: Holiday Inn Express, Park Northwood, Northwood Ave, Dublin 9, Ireland

Conference Dates: October 07-08, 2019

Hotel Services & Amenities

  • Audio/Visual Equipment Rental.
  • Business Center.
  • Business Phone Service.
  • Complimentary Printing Service.
  • Express Mail.
  • Fax.
  • Meeting Rooms.
  • Office Rental.
  • Photo Copying Service.
  • Secretarial Service.
  • Telex.
  • Typewriter.
  • Video Conference.
  • Video Messaging.
  • Video Phone.
  • ATM.
  • Baggage Storage.

Transportation

Route Map

About City

Dublin, capital of the Republic of Ireland, is on Ireland’s east coast at the mouth of the River Liffey. Its historic buildings include Dublin Castle, dating to the 13th century, and imposing St Patrick’s Cathedral, founded in 1191. City parks include landscaped St Stephen’s Green and huge Phoenix Park, containing Dublin Zoo. The National Museum of Ireland explores Irish heritage and culture. Residing in a wide bay, Dublin lies between Howth in the north and the headland of Dalkey to the south. The River Liffey, which flows into the harbor, slices the city in two. Several bridges span the north-south divide, the most famous of which is O’Connell Bridge. Pre-independence Dublin was once the second city of the British Empire, the graceful Georgian architecture and picturesque parks bearing testament to a troubled legacy. Ireland’s capital has given the world such renowned literary figures as Yeats, Beckett, Joyce, Shaw, and Wilde. Dubbed a UNESCO City of Literature in 2010, Dublin’s written tradition stretches back to 800 A.D. with The Books of Kells, which is now on permanent exhibition at Trinity College. Although Dublin sprawls rather than soars, the city centre is easily explored on-foot and a convenient transport network takes you wherever you wish to go. Here is archaeological debate regarding precisely where Dublin was established by Celtic-speaking people in the 7th century AD. Later expanded as a Viking settlement, the Kingdom of Dublin became Ireland’s principal city following the Norman invasion. The city expanded rapidly from the 17th century and was briefly the second largest city in the British Empire before the Acts of Union in 1800.